Economic Basics

Wealth Effect Explained

Wealth Effect Explained

The wealth effect is a situation when consumer spending rises in an economy as a result of people feeling wealthier.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Basics by on April 16, 2014 0 Comments
Cyclical Deficit Explained

Cyclical Deficit Explained

In economics, a deficit occurs when the government of a country spends more money than it receives. There are two main types of deficit: cyclical deficits and structural deficits.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Basics by on April 4, 2014 0 Comments
Output Gap Explained

Output Gap Explained

An output gap is when the output, or gross domestic product (GDP), of an economy is different from its potential output.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Basics by on March 24, 2014 0 Comments

Economic News and Opinion

Gas: No Laughing Matter!

Gas: No Laughing Matter!

The United Kingdom and Europe is heavily dependent on natural gas supplies for its energy needs for industry and domestic use.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic News and Opinion by on April 16, 2014 0 Comments
Britain’s Productivity Puzzle

Britain’s Productivity Puzzle

Variously described as a “puzzle”, a “problem” and a “crisis”, Britain’s productivity gap is a major concern for Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England and Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic News and Opinion by on April 14, 2014 0 Comments
Herbalife. The Pyramid Wobbles

Herbalife. The Pyramid Wobbles

On December 20th 2012, Ackman, founder and owner of Pershing Square Capital Management, launched a campaign against the multi-level marketing company Herbalife with a 342 slide presentation.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic News and Opinion by on April 13, 2014 0 Comments

Economic History

Forgotten Violent Actors: Privateers

Forgotten Violent Actors: Privateers

Not nearly as famous as pirates, or as infamous as mercenaries, privateers have become a largely forgotten phenomenon of the pre-modern world. Of course, this is a debatable opinion, since most history students would agree that privateering constituted a major element of global trade and military conflicts for nearly 400 years.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic History by on December 2, 2013 0 Comments
The First and Second Bank of the United States – A History of Central Banking

The First and Second Bank of the United States – A History of Central Banking

The Hamiltonian banks The United States’ Federal Reserve is undoubtedly one of the most important economic and financial institutions in the US and like all institutions of such importance it is easy for mainstream discourse to take it for granted. To forget the history of central banking in the US however would entail a dangerous […]

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic History by on October 26, 2013 2 Comments
Opportunity Costs in Frederic Bastiat’s Broken Window

Opportunity Costs in Frederic Bastiat’s Broken Window

While in contemporary Economics the notion of opportunity costs is usually a foregone conclusion in calculations of various economic scales, it is a surprisingly recent addition to the subject area.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic History by on October 7, 2013 0 Comments

Economic Biographies

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946)

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946)

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was a British economist most famous for a set of ideas regarding macroeconomics that would eventually coalesce into the Keynesian economics school of economic thought and theory.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Biographies by on February 13, 2014 0 Comments
Milton Friedman (1912-2006)

Milton Friedman (1912-2006)

Milton Friedman (1912-2006) was an American economist, famous for his writings that formed the basis of the monetarist macroeconomic policy that opposed Keynesianism.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Biographies by on September 10, 2013 0 Comments
Adam Smith (1723-1790)

Adam Smith (1723-1790)

Adam Smith (1723-1790) was a philosopher and economist, who came to be known as the “father of modern economics” through his main piece of work ‘An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations’.

Continue Reading »

Filed in Economic Biographies by on September 1, 2013 0 Comments

Most Recent Articles

Wealth Effect Explained

Filed in Economic Basics by on April 16, 2014 0 Comments
Wealth Effect Explained

The wealth effect is a situation when consumer spending rises in an economy as a result of people feeling wealthier.

Continue Reading »

Gas: No Laughing Matter!

Filed in Economic News and Opinion by on April 16, 2014 0 Comments
Gas: No Laughing Matter!

The United Kingdom and Europe is heavily dependent on natural gas supplies for its energy needs for industry and domestic use.

Continue Reading »

Britain’s Productivity Puzzle

Filed in Economic News and Opinion by on April 14, 2014 0 Comments
Britain’s Productivity Puzzle

Variously described as a “puzzle”, a “problem” and a “crisis”, Britain’s productivity gap is a major concern for Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England and Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne.

Continue Reading »